THE MORALITY PLEDGE

BRYCE ON MORALITY

- “And if I stumble, grant me the courage to ask for help.”

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We take several pledges and oaths during our lifetime, a symbolic and public commitment to certain ideals and principles. For example, the pledge of allegiance to the flag of the United States expresses our commitment to our country and patriotism. Just about everyone in our government must take an oath to defend and protect the Constitution of the United States. Our wedding vows represent our commitment to our spouse. Even street gangs and organized crime allegedly have symbolic oaths binding their members to their groups, for better or worse.

As I have just completed my series of articles on “Stand Up for MORALITY,” I have been asked what kind of token gesture we should make to express our commitment to improving morality. I thought about this long and hard, whereby I devised the following pledge which is intended to recognize the impact of morality on society and define some basic values the general populace can subscribe to. The pledge is not based on religion, thereby making it universally applicable to anyone who understands the need to practice and promote morality in this country.

The Morality Pledge

I believe morality is a distinguishing characteristic of our culture.
A society without morality is primitive and barbaric.
I know I am not perfect but I will try to lead a virtuous life, not just for myself, but for my family, friends, community, and country.
I will always try to do what is fair, equitable, honorable, or common sense under the circumstances.
I will adhere to the laws, rules, regulations of the land, as well as the local customs, courtesies, and social norms.
If I consider the laws, rules, and regulations immoral, I will endeavor to change them peacefully.
It is my responsibility to become a positive role model, promote moral values, and urge others to develop a moral compass.
I will recognize, and not ridicule, a person practicing a moral act, and will not accept the immoral behavior of others.
I recognize humans are imperfect and make mistakes, but we should strive to improve our society, not destroy it.
I may forgive a transgression, but I certainly will not forget and allow it to be repeated.
I believe in the moral values of honesty, courtesy, respect, kindness, honor, loyalty, courage, integrity, dedication and pride in workmanship.
I will do unto others as I would have others do unto me.
I will respect my elders and those in superior position.
I will help, aid, and assist all persons less fortunate, as I am able to.
I will not wrong, cheat or defraud another.
I will respect the property of others.
I will work faithfully, professionally, and industriously for those employing my services.
I will respect the dignity of the human spirit and treat people fairly and equitably.
I will not do anything to bring dishonor to myself, my family, my community, my profession, and my country.
I will endeavor to take responsibility for my actions and not become a burden on society.
I recognize this will be a difficult task, but grant me the power to resist temptation and do what is right.
And if I stumble, grant me the courage to ask for help.

Something as simple as this pledge may have a profound effect on how morality is implemented in this country. Simply place your right hand over your heart, the sign of fidelity, raise your left hand, repeat the pledge, and express your commitment…. There, that wasn’t so bad was it?

Mr. Bryce is available to speak on this subject

Keep the Faith!

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Tim Bryce is a writer and the Managing Director of M&JB Investment Company (M&JB) of Palm Harbor, Florida and has over 30 years of experience in the management consulting field. He can be reached at timb001@phmainstreet.com

For Tim’s columns, see:
timbryce.com

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Copyright © 2013 by Tim Bryce. All rights reserved.

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About TimBryce

Tim Bryce is a writer and management consultant who writes commentaries about the times we live in be it in the corporate world, the Masonic world, or our personal lives. His writings are well known on the Internet and are humorous, educational, and at times controversial. You won’t always agree with him, but Tim will definitely get you thinking.

To read more of Tim’s columns, please visit: timbryce.com

Comments

  1. Abdul Wahid Osman Belal says:

    The concept of Morality in Islam exclusively based on its sacred book Quran and the Sayings and Practice of the Prophet of Islam is altogether different from that of Judaism and Christianity and Freemasonry, etc.

  2. Abdul –

    Thanks for your note. Surely you are not suggesting the Quran does all of the thinking for Arabs? We all have a sense of “Natural Law” whether there is a holy book or not.

    All the Best,
    Tim

  3. Abdul Wahid Osman Belal says:

    For a Muslim there is no concept of Natural Law and if there be any such it has to be subordinate and subservient to that of Islamic Law.

  4. TimBryce says:

    Abdul – Let’s assume for a moment there is no holy book. A person would act in accordance with what they perceived as right and wrong; this is what is meant by “Natural Law.” Even young babies behave in this manner. As we get older and are taught new things, such as through a holy book, our interpretation of Natural Law changes. All humans possess “Natural Law.”

    All the Best,
    Tim

  5. TimBryce says:

    You can now obtain a mini-poster of the pledge, suitable for printing, under the “Bryce’s Laws” section of my web page, or specifically:
    http://www.phmainstreet.com/mba/blog/brycemoral.pdf

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